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An Interview with Lewis Harrison

 

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Welcome to Author Talk. Today I have the wonderful pleasure of interviewing Lewis Harrison of “Ask Lewis” fame.

  1.  What are your ambitions for your writing career?
    To make a difference in the lives of others through motivation, inspiration and information.
  2. How long have you been writing?
    49 years
  3. Which writers inspire you?
    Lao Tzu, Suzuki Roshi, Alan Watts
  4. Which actor/actress would you like to see playing the lead character from your most recent book?
    Bruce Willis
  5. What is the easiest thing about writing?
    Writing
  6.  How long on average does it take you to write a book?
    30 days
  7. Do you ever get writer’s Block?
    No
  8. Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors.
    Mostly Wikipedia and online research. I.B. Singer
  9. For your own reading, do you prefer e-books or traditional paper/hard back books?
    Traditional
  10. What & whose book/s are you reading at present?
    “Genius” about the physicist Richard Feynman By James Gleick
  11. Do you proofread/edit all your own books or do you get someone to do that for you?
    Someone else
  12. Do you let the book stew – leave it for a month and then come back to it to edit?
    Sometimes
  13. When did you decide to become a writer? What made you decide to sit down and actually start something?
    I knew at 10 years old that that was what I wanted to be. My mother gave me a copy of “Writers Market” and that was it.
  14. Why do you write?
    I can’t help myself.
  15. Do you write full-time or part-time? Do you have a special time to write or how is your day structured?
    I write 12 hours a day
  16. Do you aim for a set amount of words/pages per day? How successful are you at achieving that goal?
    I work on 20 books at a time. ½ hour daily per book.
  17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand? Do you use a special writing program, or just type away?
    Computer
  18. Where do the your ideas come from?
    In dreams, epiphanies, debates with friends about ideas.
  19. Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just see where an idea takes you?
    All flow in fiction. From an outline for non-fiction
  20. How do you think you’ve evolved creatively?
    I have less faith in what people consider facts. And look for the contrarian view.
  21. What is the hardest thing about writing?
    For me…spelling and grammar
  22. What was the hardest thing about writing your latest book? Always being drawn to think out of the box.
  23. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route? Speaking and Social networking. Publishing is radically changing
  24. Would you or do you use a PR agency?
    I would
  25.  Do you have any advice for other authors on how to market their books?
    FB, Twitter, study how to market books through social networking
  26. What part of your writing time do you devote to marketing your book?
    I post what I write as blogs so there is not much division
  27. How do you relax?
    Writing, watch a movie each night, cook, argue about politics and economic with my wife
  28. What is your favourite motivational phrase.
    “If you live in the material world the dark side is your agent and gets a 25% cut of everything.” This gets me through challenges
  29. What is your favourite positive saying?
    All you need is love
  30.  What is your favourite book and why?
    The Tao te Ching by Lao Tzu. Pure mystic and practical wisdom
  31. What is your favourite movie and why?
    House of Games. It is all Game Theory and I love game theory
  32. Where can you see yourself in 5 years time?
    Doing the same but wiser and richer
  33. What advice would you give to your younger self?
    Don’t change a thing.
  34. Which famous person, living or dead would you like to meet and why?
    Buckminster Fuller. He understood what was really going on
  35. If you could have been the original author of any book, what would it have been and why?
    The Bible. Too many contradictions. Jesus got it right. The Apostle didn’t

Well, thank you About Your Books

  1. What genre are your books?
    Self Help, Personal Development, Human Potential, Alternative Medicine, Political Science, economics, World Affairs
  2. What draws you to this genre?
    My passion for ideas
  3.  How much research do you do?
    Large amounts
  4.  Have you written any other books in collaboration with other writers? If so, with whom?
    Yes. D. B Lawrence, Laura Jones
  5.  Why did you do decide to collaborate and did that affect your sales?
    One was my business partner, the other a student collaborator. No effect on sales
  6.  What would you say are the main advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing against being published or the other way around?
    Unless I get a large advance I can do what a publisher can do unless they have a strong private list of buyers
  7. What do you do to get book reviews? How successful has your quest for reviews been so far? I have people post reviews on Amazon
  8. Do you have a strategy for finding reviewers?
    Yes. I give free copies to those who will review the book
  9. What are your thoughts on good/bad reviews?
    They matter
  10.  Any amusing story about marketing books that happened to you? I often do free life coaching. Some of my students begin study groups in library book clubs and use my books
  11. What’s your views on social media for marketing? Which social network worked best for you?
    The absolute future is in social media. I use it extensively
  12. Any tips on what to do and what not to do?
    Face, Google plus, twitter, You Tube, Instagram
  13. Did you do a press release, Goodreads book launch or anything else to promote your work and did it work?
    No but I would
  14. Did you get interviewed by local press/radio for your book launch? Yes. I also have my own show on an NPR affiliated station WIOX 91.3 FM. It streams at WIOXRadio.org 4-6 on Thursdays (EST)
  15. Is there any marketing technique you used that had an immediate impact on your sales figures?
    Giving talks
  16. Did you make any marketing mistakes or is there anything you would avoid in future?
    Giving away free copies to the wrong people
  17. What do you think of “trailers” for books?
    They are good
  18. Do you have a trailer or do you intend to create one for your own book/s?
    I will create one
  19.  Do you think that giving books away free works and why? Sometimes
  20. What advice would you give to aspiring writers?
    Read great writers and your own writing will naturally improve
  21. Where do you see publishing going in the future?
    On-line

Thank you Lewis. I have seen your inspiring posts on both Facebook and

Finally, we’d all like to hear mAbout Your Current Book

Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is so special?
He is a Trickster who can see things going on physically that everyone seems to miss.

 What are you working on at the minute?
Filling out this questionnaire.

The Official Barter Book

There is Hope (About mental illness)

Extraordinary Days in an Ordinary Life: Biographical Short Stories

 Book of Power and Influence

Make Choices, Not Excuses: Tools, Techniques and Strategies for Solving Your Problem: Done

 Healing Depression Naturally  (an update)

 The Trickster Project: (Alternative Title – “The Noble Trickster Guru’s Guide to Creating a Functional Reality” Done

Connecting the Dots: Conspiracy Theories and 1984: Is Orwell’s Reality Here?

 Lewis Harrison’s Applied Game Theory: Systematic Strategies for Prospering in a Chaotic World

Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: 200 Visionaries, Heroes and Game Changers

The Visionary Project: Tools, Tips and Strategies for Thinking Like a Visionary

That was Zen, This is Tao: Teachings,  Stories, and Koans refitted for the 21st Century

Understanding the Middle East- DONE

Living the Good Life: How to Live Like the 1% When You Are Part of the 99% DONE

The Problem Solvers (A novel about anonymous eccentrics who belong to a secret society of problems solvers). Game Theory

 The Tao te Ching: A Micro Analysis on the Writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu with additional

 Lucid Dreams: A Stream of Consciousness Novel 

Is this book part of a series? What are your thoughts on writing a book series.
Some are. I have a series of e-books called“Ask Lewis”

Did you format your own book? In what formats is your book available?
I use outside vendors

If formatted by someone else, how did you select them and what was your experience?
Fiverr. I try many grogs before i find my prince

Tell us about the cover/s and how it/they came about. Who designed your book cover/s?
Fiverr

Do you think that the cover plays an important part in the buying process?
Sometimes

How are you publishing this book and why?
Both

How can readers discover more about you and you work? www.asklewis.com, www.chihealer.com or just call me at 212-724-8782

Please list all of your published books here.

  • Massageworks – 1983 (Co-Authored with D. B. Lawrence (Putnam Books)
  • Helping Yourself with Natural Healing – 1987 (Prentice- Hall)
  • Making Fats and Oils Work for You -1990 (Avery Books)
  • 30-Day Body Purification – 1994 (Prentice-Hall)
  • The Complete Fats and Oils Book – 1996 (Avery Books)
  • Hands-on-Healing: Massage for Total Health the Shaman’s Way – 1998 (Kensington Books)
  • Master Your Metabolism – 2003 (Source Books)
  • Healing Depression Naturally – 2004 (Kensington Books)
  • Wealth Without Cash: Barter, Reciprocal Trade, and Alternative Economics – 2005 (Self Published Manual)
  • Live Like a Millionaire on $17,000 a Year – 2009 (Blooming Twig Books)
  • Harrison’s Massage Manual: A Book of Multicultural Approaches to Touch for Advanced Massage Practitioners and Mental Health Professionals – 2013 ((Self Published)
  • Spiritual, Not Religious: Sacred Tools for Modern Times (Self Published 2014)
  • Building Your Business in the New Digital Economy (Motivational Press 2014)
  • Gamification for Business (Motivational Press 2014)

Website: www.AskLewis.com
Blog:www.chihealer.com
Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/realuguru/?ref=br_rs
https://www.facebook.com/askLewis
https://www.facebook.com/LewisHarrisonsNaturalHealingAcademy/?ref=br_rs
Twitter: Twitter@AskLewisH
Google: https://plus.google.com/100989044867743006979
Amazon Author Page:http://www.amazon.com/Lewis-Harrison/e/B001H6W6Y4/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2?qid=1427990374&sr=8-2
Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/lewisharrison1

Do you have a Video link you would like included in this published interview? Please paste it here:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCY-dKQme7nZPDT2x-FMODsg

(* Any order you like and if I’ve missed anything, just type it in.)

The second photo is with 100 year old “professor” Irwin Cory one of the great comedians of the 20th century and a mentor of Lenny Bruce and George Carlin

The third photo is what is use for media

The fourth photo is with Spaulding Grey a pioneer in Perfromance Art

The forth photo is with the great Talmudic scholar – Rabbi Mintz

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An Interview with Cathie Whitmore

 

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Welcome to Author Talk,

Today I have the distinguished privilege of interviewing Cathie Whitmore of Atom Children’s Books (A Touch Of Magic). So without further ado, we will jump right into our interview today and find out more about you and your background.

To begin with Cathie, please tell us a Little about Yourself and Your Background

I believe my story is one of fate, as becoming a writer had never entered my head, let alone delving into the world of self publishing. I have to wonder where life would have taken me if I hadn’t been asked to write a children’s story for a friend to market at University in 2006. Back then I had no idea I even had the ability to write – now I can’t imagine not writing.

Fate intervened for a second time in 2007, placing an amazing graphic artist right there in front of me at our local library. A friendly chat, followed by coffee the next morning and we were on our way to bringing my words to life with wonderful illustrations.

My husband Phil and I started Atom (A Touch of Magic) Children’s Books back in 2009, when we published our first book. Placing Twinkle the Christmas Star in over 150 bookstores around the country, resulting in many book signings and school visits, gave me the satisfaction of knowing I had created something to be proud of.

They say ‘three times proves it,’ and in my case it’s true. I had many stories ready to illustrate, but one in particular was my favourite and in my mind it had to be book number three. My illustrator wasn’t keen on my choice as she hates spiders and as luck would have it, I just happened to run into a young mum working at our local bank who had bought a copy of my first book for her son. As it turns out, she had been on maternity leave for twelve months and right when I needed another illustrator, there she was. We have now published three children’s picture books, a chapter book for older children and my first novel in the women’s fiction genre.

My motto is “Imagination Lives in Books” along with my heart and my passion for writing.

  1. What are your ambitions for your writing career?
    As a self published author of four children’s books and my first novel for adults, my ambition is to one day publish all of my work. I have a second women’s fiction novel in the pipeline and another sixteen children’s stories written, but not yet illustrated.
  2. How long have you been writing?
    I won a poetry competition at school when I was eight, so I guess you could say my passion for writing started way back then.
  3. Which writers inspire you?
    I have loved Roald Dahl for as long as I can remember and E.B. White is also up there amongst my favourite children’s authors. As a reader, I enjoy the work of Olivia Goldsmith, Cecelia Ahearn, Jodi Picoult and many other writers of women’s fiction. However, I guess I would have to say I haven’t actually been inspired by any one of them in particular, as I never had any aspirations to become a writer. It just happened.
  4. Which actor/actress would you like to see playing the lead character from your most recent book?
    My most recent book is a women’s fiction novel, and I can imagine someone like Emily VanCamp, from Revenge, playing the lead role. My main character, Celeste, is in some ways similar to Emily– a beautiful, yet manipulative and demanding women, who will go to any length to get what see wants. The only difference is, my story is very humorous at times, so Celeste does have another side to her personality.
  5. What is the easiest thing about writing?
    The easiest thing about writing for me is the ease at which it flows. I have been a typist for almost fifty years and I find my fingers just seem to take over the keyboard, and the ideas are transferred straight from my brain to the laptop, without me really thinking too much about it.
  6. How long on average does it take you to write a book?
    The initial draft of my first children’s story, titled Hammie Goes to School, which evolved into a 44 page hardcover picture book, took me approximately three hours. Then I decided to re-read Charlotte’s Web and that gave me a whole new insight into how much better a children’s story can be with the use of character dialogue. That technique probably took another week or so to perfect.
  7. Do you ever get writer’s Block? If so, Any tips on how to get through the dreaded writer’s block?
    I have never really experienced writer’s block to any great degree as what I am writing, just seems to come to me and I just keeping typing, never knowing where it is likely to end.
  8. Do you read much and if so who are your favourite authors.
    I love to read, but these days I spend more time writing than reading. My favourite authors are the ones I mentioned in Question #3. However, I often read women’s fiction written by authors I have never heard of. The style of writing is more important to me than the actual author.
  9. For your own reading, do you prefer e-books or traditional paper/hard back books?
    I was totally against eBooks for my children’s stories, as I felt they were so impersonal and took away the wonderful one-on-one experience of a parent or grandparent reading to a child. However, now a few years down the track I have had all my books created as eBooks, and I think as authors, we either have to go with the flow or miss the boat. The ironic thing is, I vowed I would never read on a tablet and had no desire to own one. Then I relented, buying an iPad for the specific purpose of being able to see my children’s eBooks on the internet. Now, three years later and I am hooked. The convenience of the iPad outweighs my old fashioned values and I am now an avid eBook reader.
  10. What & whose book/s are you reading at present?
    I have joined an Amazon group called Write-On where authors put their work out there for comment. There is some wonderful work on this site and at present I am following a couple of authors as we read and review for each other. I am also a member of Australian Writer’s Rock, where I came across ‘The Dandelion,’ one of the best books I have read in a long time, as it’s basically a therapy session in book form.
  11. Do you proofread/edit all your own books or do you get someone to do that for you?
    I do all my own proofreading and editing as I can’t afford to pay someone else to do it. It’s a slow and tedious process, but I have learnt a lot about writing and consequently changed things in my manuscript as I went along. I’m not sure an editor could have done a better job than I have done myself, as I have often come across errors in books professionally edited. From what I have heard from other authors, proofreaders and editors are not always what they are cracked up to be.
  12. Do you let the book stew – leave it for a month and then come back to it to edit?
    At the end of each chapter, I read through my work to check for errors. During that process, I often come across things I want to change. However, once the story is complete, I believe it’s important to reread the entire manuscript again. I made the mistake of rushing into an eBook with my first women’s fiction novel, as it reached quarter-final status in the 2014 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Awards. Then twelve months down the track, after learning many more tricks of the trade, I have just finished revamping my novel to make it the best it can possibly be. My impulsive personality is a costly one as now I know I am capable of better, the original eBook is in the process of being replaced with the new you beaut version.
  13. When did you decide to become a writer? What made you decide to sit down and actually start something?
    Growing up I had written a few short rhyming poems and messages on greeting cards etc, but the idea of writing a book never actually entered my head. Then in 2006, I was asked by the daughter of a friend, if I could write a children’s story for her to market as a university project. Retirement certainly allowed me the time and my curiosity gave me the inclination to have a go. When I sat down to write my first story titled Hammie Goes to School, I had no real idea of what the story would be about. The only thing I knew for sure was I would base my story around a piglet named Hammie as when I was a child, Hammie was my mother’s Irish uncle’s name. This story unleashed a passion in me I never knew existed as once I started I couldn’t stop. Over the following eight weeks, I wrote nine more stories in the series titled The Adventures of Hammie.
  14. Why do you write?
    I have always been one for having a part-time hobby, such as silk screen printing, ceramics, leadlight, beading…and the list goes on. Yet I have never stuck to anything for all that long, as I tend to get bored doing the same old thing. Writing my first story changed all that and now I can’t imagine my life without my writing. Taking on the voices of my characters through their dialogue, embroiled me in their lives in a way I never thought possible. Suddenly they became a huge part of my life, allowing me to not only think and feel for them, but become the master of their destiny. A strong attachment to my characters has always been a rewarding part of my writing, as each and every one takes on a personality of their own, etching themselves in my imagination forever.
  15. Do you write full-time or part-time? Do you have a special time to write or how is your day structured?
    My day starts on my laptop first thing in the morning and I begrudgingly fit in the mundane household chores in between. I have no structure, just obsession, as once I have an idea in my head, it consumes me and I can’t rest until I have turned it into a sentence, a paragraph and often an entire chapter. I learnt to type at the age of fifteen and my speed certainly comes in handy now as I can punch a lot out in a relatively short period of time. As long as the ideas are flowing, I keep going, oblivious to anything else around me. Needless to say, my hubby is not always a happy chappy.
  16. Do you aim for a set amount of words/pages per day? How successful are you at achieving that goal?
    I never set goals, as that way of writing is way too structured for me. I write when I can and stop when I have other more pressing things to do. However, I am never away from my manuscript for an extended period of time, as my head is always bursting with ideas I am compelled to put into words.
  17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand? Do you use a special writing program, or just type away?
    I write on my laptop in Microsoft Word, but I normally set my manuscript out in a print format, to keep track of the number of pages and also to see what it will look like as a printed book.
  18. Where do your ideas come from?
    Well that is the weird thing with me. An idea just pops into my head and I run with it. When I start to write, I begin with a basic idea of what the first chapter will be about, and then it just seems to evolve from there without me really steering it in any direction. I have no idea where the ideas come from…but they just do. When I decided to write my first women’s fiction novel, I set the story in 1998. Then when I got a few chapters into it, it occurred to me I would need to go back to the previous generation to give the story some background and more substance. Consequently, my original first chapter, ended up as chapter nineteen of thirty.
  19. Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just see where an idea takes you?
    I normally start with a vague idea of the initial plot and the rest just seems to evolve as I go. At times when I read back over my work, I can’t really remember even writing certain parts of it. I think my writing process is an automatic one between my brain and my fingers on the laptop keyboard, as it’s not something I nut out beforehand.
  20. How do you think you’ve evolved creatively?
    Other than winning a poetry competition at school at the age of eight, my creativity lay dormant for so many years, I had forgotten it ever existed. In fact I doubt I would ever have become a writer if I hadn’t been asked to write a children’s book for someone else. My reply to that request back in 2009 was “I’m not promising anything…I have no idea if I can do it, but I’ll give it a go.”
  21. What is the hardest thing about writing?
    As we are retired, my husband perceives my writing as a hobby that shouldn’t interfere with our day to day lives. Boy have I got news for him…and it’s all bad. When my head is filled with ideas, I’m desperate to put them into words and I resent the interruptions. Consequently, walking away from my laptop in the middle of something I’m trying to put into words before it escapes me, is the height of frustration. My head won’t be quiet while I go about my daily chores and I am forever drawn back to my laptop to add something else I have just thought of. For me, that is the hardest thing about writing.
  22. What was the hardest thing about writing your latest book?
    Having written twenty children’s stories, four of which I have self published, I decided to try my hand at writing for adults. Piece by Piece is my first adult novel and it took my imagination to another level, far removed from the childlike rhyming style I have become so accustomed to. The hardest thing for me was I worried that the adult content in my novel would shock my readers and my image as a children’s author and grandmother of eight would be shattered forever. I wrote those scenes as tastefully as I could, but I still felt I was stepping out of my comfort zone a little, and at the end of the day, my reputation as a children’s author may suffer for it.
  23. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?
    I have an online presence, with two websites – one for my children’s books and another for my adult novel. I also have two Facebook pages – a personal and a business one. My books are available in both print and electronic format on iTunes, Amazon, Kobo etc. Writing my stories is the easy part, but marketing has always posed a big problem for me. I sell face-to-face at markets, fairs, book signings etc, but I need to spread my wings much further than that. I honestly don’t know what the answer is when it comes to marketing. All I know is, I have a good product to sell but how I get it out there to the masses is something I struggle with every day.
  24. Would you or do you use a PR agency?
    My feelings on this are unless I have a huge amount of money to throw at it, I would be just throwing my money away. Therefore the answer for me is, under my present circumstances I wouldn’t use a PR agency, but if by chance I came into some money, it certainly would be food for thought.
  25. What part of your writing time do you devote to marketing your book?
    As yet I have not devoted a huge amount of time to marketing my books, as I really have no idea where to start, other than the market efforts I mentioned in Question 23. I have just paid for a course in Facebook marketing, which I can do at my own pace at home. I am hoping this will steer me in the right direction.
  26. How do you relax?
    I totally lose myself in my writing and find it the most relaxing thing I can do.
  27. What is your favourite motivational phrase.
    Imagination lives in books,” is one I came up with in 2012. I write different messages to readers when I sign my books, but I think this is my favourite one.
  28. What is your favourite positive saying?
    “Life’s too short to sell yourself short.”
  29. What is your favourite book and why?
    It is too difficult to narrow it down to just one book, so I have chosen one I read recently titled “The Opposite of Maybe” written by Maddie Dawson. I love her no- nonsense way of writing. The story is not bogged down with overly descriptive text and moves at a pace that keeps me interested. Maddie makes me feel as though she is talking to me. I formed a strong connection with her characters and when I finished the book, I was sad it was over, as it left me with that feel good feeling I often experience at the end of a good movie and I didn’t want it to end.
  30. What is your favourite quote?
    “Every picture tells a story.”
  31. What is your favourite movie and why?
    That is another multiple choice question for me as I have enjoyed many movies. Being a romantic, I would have to say, Pretty Woman stands out amongst them as one of my all time favourites. Emotion and humour all bundled in together, gets me every time.
  32. Where can you see yourself in 5 years time?
    I have never really thought that far ahead in terms of my writing career. I would like to think by that stage of my life, I might have received the recognition I have been seeking for my work. However, writing is a pleasurable experience for me and something I can never imagine myself not doing. To be successful would be nice, but if it never happens I will just continue to write for the love of it.
  33. What advice would you give to your younger self?
    Life is not about having what we want…but more about wanting what we have. Contentment is the key to happiness and we all have to do whatever it takes to make it happen.
  34. Which famous person, living or dead would you like to meet and why?
    I am going to go with the first person who popped into my head and that is John Lennon. As a writer, I could have said Beatrix Potter or Roald Dahl, but that would not be exactly truthful. As a twelve year old, back in 1964, John Lennon was my idol and as real to me as if I had known him personally. I was shattered when he died and even today at the age of 63, if it were possible, I would still jump at the chance to meet him.
  35. If you could have been the original author of any book, what would it have been and why?
    As a late bloomer when it comes to writing, knowing what I know today, I would have to say Fifty Shades of Grey would be high up there on my list of books with a difference. I am not saying I am in awe of the author or the calibre of her work, but she has managed to stumble upon overnight success due to the fact she was clever enough to come up with something different which appealed to millions of women around the world. There is no denying sex sells, but as an author, I would die of boredom writing it. I only made it through about 20 percent of the first fifty shades book, but I have to give E. L. James full marks for her ingenuity. The interesting thing is, I just had to go and look at the book cover to remind myself of the name of the author. What does that tell you?

Well, that is certainly a lot of information Cathie. I must say that I empathise with you regarding your writing and the need to get it down. It is rather addictive.

About Your Books

  1. What genre are your books?
    With the help of two very talented illustrators, I have self published three hard cover picture books for children 3-8 and a chapter book for children 7-11. So far I have only written one novel for adults, I would class it as women’s fiction and I have a second one under way.
  2. What draws you to this genre?
    As I have mentioned earlier, my introduction to writing was purely accidental and led me to write my first children’s story. My natural talent for rhyming played a big part in my love of writing for children and from 2006 until 2013 I finished around twenty manuscripts. Four of which I self published. Towards the end of 2013 I decided to try my hand at writing for adults and I guess now I have achieved that, I feel I have written enough children’s story to last me a lifetime, but my future as a writer of women’s fiction has only just been born.
  3. How much research do you do?
    I did a lot of research on children’s books after I wrote the initial draft of my first story. Reading E.B. White’s Charlotte’s Web, taught me to give the characters a voice rather than just narrating the story myself. I have since learnt this is ‘showing rather than telling,’ and I have stuck with that style of writing ever since. I also spent a lot of time looking at successful children’s books as far as cover design etc goes. My adult novel is purely a work of fiction and came straight from my head and my heart, so little research was needed for most of that one. However, one of my characters was involved in the Vietnam war, which was a bit of a challenge for me as even though I lived through that era, I knew little about post traumatic stress disorder and the affect it could have on a relationship. Being predominately a children’s author, I tend to bury my head in the sand when it comes to the harsh realities of life and I certainly had to do my homework to gather the information I needed to make my story believable.
  4. Have you written any other books in collaboration with other writers? If so, with whom?
    No.
  5. What would you say are the main advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing against being published or the other way around?
    Self publishing taught me a lot as I did it from scratch without the aid of a middle man. From start to finish the process only involved myself and my illustrator, who did the layout for me. Self publishing is easy and I will continue to do it, as it’s cost effective and a guarantee of getting my work out there, particularly with eBooks. However, I often think it would be wonderful to be picked up by a mainstream publisher who could put me on the map. And to be honest, that is the only real advantage I can see in having a publisher as opposed to self publishing.
  6. What do you do to get book reviews? How successful has your quest for reviews been so far?
    Joining author sites such as Goodreads, Book Country and Write-On etc. is a good way of getting book reviews, but when it comes to the sites that actually sell books, like Amazon and iTunes, I have not been at all successful in getting reviews for my work. It seems to me that if an author has a lot of computer savvy friends who read eBooks from these sites, they stand a good chance of getting reviews from them. However, whether those reviews can be relied upon as a truthful reflection of the author’s ability to write something worth reading is an unknown quantity. I am waiting in line for a review by April Wood, A Well Read Woman. I am still a long way down the‘coming reviews’ list, but fingers crossed when it happens, it will be a good one.
  7. Do you have a strategy for finding reviewers?
    If I could move my friends along into the twenty-first century and get them into reading eBooks, I might be in with a chance of getting reviews. However, I think a lot of women in my generation prefer to read printed books they buy from bookshops. Once the book is read, they are not likely to get onto an online bookshop to leave a comment on a book. Whereas with eBooks purchased through places like Amazon, they email to ask what you thought of the title, prompting the reader to leave a review. I think book reviews tend to narrow down the choices for a reader to a certain degree, as we can be easily swayed by those five star ratings and most of us will at least take the time to have a look. Samples are usually free to download, which makes the choice even easier.
  8. What are your thoughts on good/bad reviews?
    I think us authors have to be thick skinned and take whatever comes our way. I think any review, good or bad is worth having, as a particular book which might suit one person might not necessarily suit the next and the reviewer will no doubt point out the reasons why. We have to be open to criticism as we certainly cannot win them all.
  9. Any amusing story about marketing books that happened to you?
    None that spring to mind, as mine are all fairly tragic.
  10. What’s your views on social media for marketing? Which social network worked best for you?
    I am keeping an open mind on that one until I complete the FaceBook Marketing Course I mentioned earlier. I watched an hour and a half Webinar and that was interesting enough for to want to sign up. However, the thought of putting the theories into practice is a daunting one, as I find a lot of it overwhelming. Maybe it will be easier than I anticipate, but as long as I keep procrastinating over it, I will never know the answer to that.
  11. Any tips on what to do and what not to do?
    Not at this stage, but that could change.
  12. Did you do a press release, Goodreads book launch or anything else to promote your work and did it work?
    Possibly if I had a clue how to do something like that on the internet, I probably would have, but my knowledge of these things is limited. However, in 2009 when my first children’s book was released, I was invited by internationally acclaimed author Peter Watt, who just happens to live in my area, to join him in the launch of his eleventh book published by Pan MacMillan titled To Touch the Clouds. Thanks to Peter and his crowd of fans, that worked extremely well for me at the time.
  13. Did you get interviewed by local press/radio for your book launch?
    I had another book launch in 2012 for my third children’s title, which was sponsored by the local newspaper and they gave me plenty of exposure. I also did an interview on local radio. We opened the launch to the public and had 130 adults and children in attendance. I was overwhelmed by the support I received from the local community and touched by their wonderful comments on my work.
  14. Is there any marketing technique you used that had an immediate impact on your sales figures?
    In 2009 with the release of my first title, I did around seventeen book signings, followed by another sixteen in 2010. These proved to be very successful, but the majority of them where with Angus and Robertson who had gone out of business by the time my third title was released in 2011.
  15. Did you make any marketing mistakes or is there anything you would avoid in future?
    My biggest marketing mistake was spending $2,200 on a fifteen second TV ad that ran a few times a day for a month. The ad was appealing and covered a wide viewing area, but it was over before it begun. I think I would have been better off opting for half the amount of thirty second ads for the same price, as I never sold a single book. Very disappointing and something I would never do again in the future.
  16. What do you think of “trailers” for books?
    Personally, I think they are a waste of money. That statement is backed up by a couple of authors I know personally who have gone down that road and felt the trailer made no difference to sales. It might be a good idea in theory, but I have to wonder how many people actually get to see it? They might work if it was possible to pay the movie theatres to run them.
  17. Do you think that giving books away free works and why?
    I have only tried it with my eBooks on iTunes, as in reality I am only giving away a piece of cyber space. As I had a total of 760 downloads I perceived this as a successful way to market my books. My logic behind this was if the people who read my book for free told their friends about it, then that would start a chain reaction, and once the ball was rolling I would slowly creep the price back up. Wrong again – I raised the price to $0.99 which is way below the normal price, and haven’t had a single sale since. I was doing much better when the books were priced at $4.99 and I’m not sure what to make of that.
  18. What advice would you give to aspiring writers?
    If you are happy to write for the love of writing, you are in for a wonderful creative experience. On the other hand, if you are pursuing it as a career and a way of making a lot of money, you could be sadly disappointed. It was once quoted to me by a very reliable source within the book industry, that only one in thirty thousand manuscripts gets picked up by a mainstream publisher. The odds are against us, but there is always an exception to the rule. Matthew Riley, started off as a self published author and his work certainly made a big impression on Pan MacMillan and they have been publishing his books ever since.
  19. Where do you see publishing going in the future?
    From where I sit as a self published author, I see lots of bricks and mortar book stores closing down. It remains to be seen, whether eBooks will continue to keep readers happy, or will they eventually go back to reading the old fashioned way? Somehow, I doubt there is much chance of the latter happening as the convenience of reading on the tablet, far outweighs lugging print books around when travelling. I never believed I could be converted in the first place, but now I cannot imagine myself going back.
  20. You have certainly had some memorable experiences Cathie. I am still out on the ebooks Vs paperbacks myself, though many people are now opting for Kindles.

So now, some news About Your Current Book

  1. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is so special?
    My main character in my novel Piece by Piece is the bitch we all love to hate. Most of us have encountered this type of person in everyday life and consequently we can easily identify with her character. I thoroughly enjoyed writing Celeste’s dialogue and that of her Mother, Eleanor as they can be volatile at times, yet their one-on-one banter is often quite amusing. I have described them in the story as the master and apprentice of manipulation, which aptly describes their personalities.
  2. What are you working on at the minute?
    I am around ten thousand words into a second novel in the women’s fiction genre. This one is a completely different storyline to my first novel and will probably take me into unfamiliar territory, as at times it is far more serious and a lot less humorous.
  3. What’s it about? (*if relevant)
    It is a love story with an intriguing twist, but it is too early to comment on this one as yet. I had so much fun writing my first novel, I am not convinced this one appeals to me in the same way. I need my writing to be entertaining from my perspective and at the moment I am contemplating two totally different plots, so at this stage the story could go either way.
  4. Is this book part of a series? What are your thoughts on writing a book series.
    I have no plans to write a series in the women’s fiction genre. However, in 2006, after writing my first children’s story titled, Hammie Goes to School, I wrote ten consecutive rhyming stories in the series titled The Adventures of Hammie. Hammie Goes to School is currently available in hardcover and also an animated eBook. The other nine stories have never been illustrated, as I feel this is too big a project for a self published author to undertake.
  5. Did you format your own book? In what formats is your book available?
    I have self published all my books with the help of my illustrator who did the layout. The books are available in print and also eBook versions.
  6. If formatted by someone else, how did you select them and what was your experience?
    My eBooks were created by a company in India who were very professional and easy to work with.
  7. Tell us about the cover/s and how it/they came about. Who designed your book cover/s?
    I have self published four children’s books working with two illustrators – both illustrating two books each for me. They also did the covers, and as I had a pre-conceived idea of what I wanted, we worked closely together to achieve an outcome we were both happy with.
  8. Do you think that the cover plays an important part in the buying process?
    As it is the first point of impact from a prospective buyer’s point of view, I think the cover design is very important. They say you can’t judge a book by it’s cover, and that is true, but for me the cover is what will make me pick up a book in the first place. Many a good story has probably been hiding behind a less than appealing cover and maybe missed the chance of being a best seller.
  9. How are you publishing this book and why? (*e.g. Indie, traditional or both)
    I will continue to self publish my work as there is no point in writing if I never see my words in print. Maybe one day a mainstream publisher will take me on, but in the meantime I am not holding my breath until it happens.
  10. How can readers discover more about you and you work?
    Through my two websites at www.atomchildrensbooks.com and www.atomadultsbooks.com

There are samples of my work on these sites and also free samples of my eBooks are available to download from iTunes, Amazon etc.

Here is my author link to iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/cathie-whitmore/id585982035?mt=11

My Published books:

Book Title: Piece by Piece (only available in eBook format at this stage)
Genre: Women’s Fiction
ISBN: 978-0-9806617-8-1 (eBook)
Publisher: Atom Adults Books
Author: Cathie Whitmore
Paperback: (Will be available approximately July/August 2015)
Distributor/Seller: eBook available through iTunes, Amazon, Kobo https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/piece-by-piece/id900424872?ls=1&mt=11
Book Cover by: Clarence Valley Review

—————————————————————

Book Title: Twinkle the Christmas Star (available in hardcover and eBook format with author narration.)
Genre: Children’s picture book
ISBN: 9780 980 661705 (Print version) and 9780 980 661767 (eBook)
Publisher: Atom Children’s Books
Author: Cathie Whitmore
Illustrator: Cathy McCulloch Hardback:
eBook available through iTunes, Amazon, Kobo (iTunes version has author narration) https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/cathie-whitmore/id585982035?mt=11
Distributor/Seller: Through my website at www.atomchildrensbooks.com or my distributor Dennis Jones and Associates.
Book Cover by: Cathy McCulloch

———————————————————————-

Book Title: Hammie Goes to School (available in hardcover and animated eBook format with narration.)
Genre: Children’s picture book
ISBN: 9780 980 661712 (Print version) and 9780 980 661750 (eBook)
Publisher: Atom Children’s Books
Author: Cathie Whitmore
Illustrator: Cathy McCulloch Hardback eBook
Distributor/Seller: Through my website at www.atomchildrensbooks.com or my distributor Dennis Jones and Associates. eBook available through iTunes, Amazon, Kobo https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/cathie-whitmore/id585982035?mt=11
Book Cover by: Cathy McCulloch

——————————————————-

Book Title: Hammie’s Song (available only in eBook format)
Genre: Children’s sing-along picture book
ISBN: 9780 980 661743 (eBook)
Publisher: Atom Children’s Books
Author: Song lyrics by Cathie Whitmore,
Illustrator: Cathy McCulloch
The song is performed by my nephew Liam Whan.
Distributor/Seller: Only available in eBook format through iTunes.
Book Cover by: Cathy McCulloch (adapted from the book Hammie Goes to School.)
Link to Hammie’s Song on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVvzNHv93HM

This is an overview of the story of Hammie Goes to School with song lyrics children can sing along to. Only available in eBook format from iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/cathie-whitmore/id585982035?mt=11

The YouTube version is free to watch but cannot be downloaded. However, because the lyrics are not broken up over pages, I think this is a better format from the continuity of the song perspective.

———————————————

Book Title: Long Legs Daddy (available in hardcover and eBook format)
Genre: Children’s picture book
ISBN: 9780 980 661712 (Print version) and 9780 980 661736 (eBook)
Publisher: Atom Children’s Books
Author: Cathie Whitmore
Illustrator: Sarajane Hinton
Hardback:eBook available through iTunes, Amazon, Kobo (iTunes version has author narration.) https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/cathie-whitmore/id585982035?mt=11 Distributor/Seller: Through my website at www.atomchildrensbooks.com or my distributor Dennis Jones and Associates.
Book Cover by: Sarajane Hinton

————————————————

Book Title: Pusshycat Tails (available in soft cover and eBook format)
Genre: Children’s chapter book
ISBN: 9780 980 661705 (Print version) and 9780 980 661774 (eBook)
Publisher: Atom Children’s Books
Author Cathie Whitmore
Illustrator: Sarajane Hinton Paperback
eBook available through iTunes, Amazon, Kobo https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/cathie-whitmore/id585982035?mt=11
Distributor/Seller: Through my website and my distributor Dennis Jones and Associates
Book Cover by: Sarajane Hinton

—————————————————————–

Website: atomchildrensbooks.com and atomadultsbooks.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cathie.whitmore https://www.facebook.com/atomchildrensbooks?ref=hl
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CathieWhitmore
Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/atomchildrensbo/
Google: https://play.google.com/store/books/author?id=Cathie+Whitmore Amazon
Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00B6KR7TK
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5397164.Cathie_Whitmore
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com.au/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=Cathie+Whitmore&rh=n%3A2490359051%2Ck%3ACathie+Whitmore
Author Link iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/cathie-whitmore/id585982035?mt=11

This is the link to my TV ad which I put on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uIRIyBmyXk
Link to Hammie’s Song on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVvzNHv93HM

 

 

 

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An Interview with Andrew Jonathan Fine

 

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Welcome to Author Talk

Today I have the pleasure of interviewing Andrew Jonathon Fine.

Please tell us a little about yourself and your background

My name is Andrew Jonathan Fine. I am 52 years old, and I am a stay at home father disabled with autism and other inherited conditions. I don’t really consider the autism all that disabling. I even skipped grade to start high school at twelve, finishing with a master’s degree in computer science by my early twenties. Unfortunately, my career had been greatly limited due to discrimination. When I lost my final job in 2005 I was never able to recover my career. I have a beautiful wife and a brilliant eleven year old girl who loves me regardless, and they are what give me purpose in life these days. I became an author mostly by accident. Desperate for a sense of purpose I had even hospitalized myself for depression a couple years ago and found myself required to reveal my life in painstaking detail on page after page of forms. This made me realize that were I to transfer this experience into fictional characters I could express my experiences without fear of putting my family on display. There’s a little bit of my life and experience in all four of the main characters I re-imagined from the Depression-Era story I read at age 11, a copy which lapsed into the public domain and therefore I could use.

Wow Andrew, that is quite a summary of your life before you started writing. I am so glad that you decided to put your experiences into a novel. There is a great deal more awareness these days of depression. I can’t wait to read the answers to this interview and find out more about you.

About You as a Writer

  1. What are your ambitions for your writing career?
    Just to be read, maybe to be popular. Money is not my primary focus. I simply want to leave a legacy for the live I have lived.
  2. How long have you been writing?
    Maybe about two years, but not full-time. This is a hobby for me.
  3. Which writers inspire you?
    C. S. Lewis, Piers Anthony, Catherine Asaro. But there are entire anime series not ascribable to any single author which also inspire me, and there are even cartoons such as My Little Pony and Adventure Time which are serious dramatic fantasy fiction.
  4. Which actor/actress would you like to see playing the lead character from your most recent book?
    I’d rather see unknowns play my lead characters. That way, a new generation of actors could have their own chance. I’m writing serious and heart-wrenching coming-of-age and first-love stuff which would nauseate me to see the likes of Disney sanitize and bowdlerized into a made-for-TV drama or comedy. This would make a poor movie outside of an art house.
  5. What is the easiest thing about writing?
    Having the time.
  6. How long on average does it take you to write a book?
    I’ve so far taken about two or three years to write this one, about half time. My primary duty these days is being a full-time homemaker.
  7. Do you ever get writer’s Block? If so, Any tips on how to get through the dreaded writer’s block?
    To me writer’s block means not having enough ideas to get my character from one point to another, so what I do instead is starting writing a different section of the book. Sometimes a different idea from a future section of the plot will justify the past part of a plot I want to complete.
  8. What & whose book/s are you reading at present?
    People with whom I am trading free reviews. I can’t afford to buy books anymore.
  9. When did you decide to become a writer? What made you decide to sit down and actually start something?
    That actually happened by accident. I was laid off by Honeywell Aerospace in 2005 and never was able to find a job since due to discrimination against my autism. Over a process of years I became slowly suicidal due to feelings of being useless. A couple of years ago I hospitalized myself for clinical depression. I was required to write reams of notes about my personal life in the course of therapy. When I was released I realized I had common themes in my notes which might make a good story in the right framework.
  10. Do you write full-time or part-time? Do you have a special time to write or how is your day structured?
    Usually in the morning I take care of correspondence, in the afternoon I do my chores, in the evening I prepare dinner for my family, and at night when everyone else is asleep I try to write for a couple of hours before I turn in.
  11. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand? Do you use a special writing program, or just type away?
    I like the LibreOffice suite as it can produce any output format needed by a publisher. For cover design I like using GIMP. Both are open source tools. It’s a lie that you need commercial ones to make good manuscripts or covers.
  12. What was the hardest thing about writing your latest book?
    Finding a way to find a credible manner in which to advance the plot. Sometimes you wind up painting yourself into a corner.
  13. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?
    I self-publish. I am 52 years old. I would be dead of old age by the time any brick-and-mortar publisher would accept my submissions. I also feel said people would discriminate against me for having autism. I’d rather trust the public to tell me why work sucks rather than keep getting rejected by editors who would give nothing but a standard form letter. I’ve been rejected by too many business owners when looking for software work to want to trust any of them any more for any other reason.
  14. Do you have any advice for other authors on how to market their books?
    Don’t look at me for advice. I don’t know the first thing. All I can do is advertise on Facebook and Twitter because those are free.
  15. How do you relax?
    My favorite way is to just spend some quality time with my wife.
  16. What is your favourite movie and why?
    It’s an anime known as ‘Yamato 2199.’ A predecessor of it back in the 70’s gave me the courage to stand up to my parents and create my own life for myself. My mother, knowing I had autism, felt I was better off staying a child by her side forever. The themes in these movies help me defy her.
  17. Where can you see yourself in 5 years time?
    In 5 years I plan to be 57 years old.

Here is a video made of Alouette’s Song.


You have a great sense of humour Andrew, we’re moving right along to hear more About Your Books

  1. What genre are your books?
    I prefer to have them called “cross-genre speculative fiction”
  2. How much research do you do?
    Fairly thorough. Online sources and some friends in the right places.
  3. What do you do to get book reviews? How successful has your quest for reviews been so far?
    Usually I either apply for them through review sites, or offer trades. Trades are actually more likely to happen. It’s slow, but sure.
  4. Do you have a strategy for finding reviewers?
    I usually have to be fairly persistent in finding review blogs. It’d say if you’re accepted by one out of every hundred you are doing good.
  5. What are your thoughts on good/bad reviews?
    My three through five stars are pretty fair. Occasionally I get the troll who just like to anonymously provide a one or two star with a gratuitous reason, just to ruin my potential for getting shown on amazon. I just can’t understand people like that.
  6. What’s your views on social media for marketing? Which social network worked best for you?
    It’s not really a matter of best more than like only. Facebook is the only way I can communicate with potential readers at no cost. Twitter is hit or miss.
  7. Did you get interviewed by local press/radio for your book launch?
    Local newspaper, a couple years ago, for my first author signing. The sheer novelty of a first release in a small town of less than 2000 people made my book sell out. Sweet. But the bad news is you can easily saturate your local market that way.
  8. Did you make any marketing mistakes or is there anything you would avoid in future?
    I’m still learning and making plenty of mistakes daily 🙂
  9. Do you think that giving books away free works and why?
    My current strategy is to give books away to a known affinity group, other people with autism like my self, in the hopes they will tell their own circle of friends and generate some word of mouth. It’s a great way to get immediate feedback. Only time will tell if that actually generates more sales.
  10. What advice would you give to aspiring writers?
    There’s no such thing as aspiring. There’s only perspiring (grin). You have to be crazy to write a book because there really is no profit in it for the average person. Tell the story you have your all-consuming passion to tell, then move on with your life and do something else with it.
  11. Where do you see publishing going in the future?
    Brick and mortar book-stores will be extinct in 20 years or less. As the cost of paper books increases to be priced out of reach to those who can’t find jobs that can sustain them and their families, the pages will be cut off their spines, scanned, and pirated by outraged anarchists. All novels will become free. No one will have the incentive to create quality text-books for schools, and you already see this happening from books being designed by committee to fit Common Core curriculum standards and religiously fundamentalist school boards. I pretty much see our future as being one where no one can earn a living of any kind being a writer. This will only accelerate the USA’s downward slide into economic neo-feudalism already being triggered by the off-shoring of high-paying professional jobs and the extinction of entire categories of high-paying occupations altogether.

Here is another video Andrew made of the background to Alouette’s Song.

Well Andrew, that certainly ended with a depth of feeling. I certainly hope you’re not right about all of that. For one thing, there is definitely an increase in people writing novels and being self published. Anyway, we will move on to read more About Your Current Book

  1. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is so special?
  2. The ‘main character’ is actually a team. I partially follow the sentai formula where each member of the teenaged team is special in some way, such as faith, ingenuity, valor, or compassion.
  3. What are you working on at the minute? 31. What’s it about? (*if relevant)
    The sequel. It’s set a generation later. The new heroes are the teen sons and daughters of the older ones. The latter serve as mentors, teachers, and supporters for the new, who form the next sentai team.
  4. Is this book part of a series? What are your thoughts on writing a book series.
    I’m thinking that Alouette’s Song, and it’s sequel, Alouette’s Dream, will be dovetailed bookends. Dream answers a lot of questions which Song asks.
  5. Did you format your own book? In what formats is your book available?
    Kindle and paperback. I use Sigil to format the precursor EPUB for the Kindle. I use LibreOffice and GIMP to create the proofs for the paperback.
  6. Tell us about the cover/s and how it/they came about. Who designed your book cover/s?
    I created an abstract cover myself using Corel Draw and GIMP, of a logo, since I don’t know how to draw free-hand art. Nobody liked that cover because it didn’t tell enough about the story. A dear friend of mine drew a cover for a pivotal scene, and I used it for a while, but the trolls slammed that one as looking infantile. I now have a professional illustrator to donated a week of her time to create a truly creditable cover, and it contains all the important elements of the story.
  7. Do you think that the cover plays an important part in the buying process?
    It seems people are incredibly fickle these days. What with the outrageous competition between self-published authors it seems that covers are now like resumes… if the resume can’t catch attention in under five seconds then forget it.
  8. How are you publishing this book and why?
    Print-on-Demand through Ingram Spark. I hope to have my book on bookstores someday, and that means I have to follow the rules the booksellers set.
  9. How can readers discover more about you and your work?
    Search Amazon and Barnes&Noble. I also have a Facebook novel page www.facebook.com/alouettesong

Please list all of your published books here. Book Title: Alouette’s Song Genre: Romantic Action/Adventure

ISBN: 9781942574125
(ISBN) B00V0YQPWC (ASIN)
Author: Andrew Jonathan Fine
Distributor/Seller: Ingram-Spark, Amazon

Website: http://wix.com/andrew-jonathan-fine
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alouettesong?fref=ts
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/eternalsquire
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/iamextremelyuse
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/ANDREW-FINE/e/B00JIBHFLO
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8123913.Andrew_Jonathan_Fine

Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/alouettes-song-andrew-jonathan-fine/1119344642?ean=9781942574125

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